the whole-y grail

the whole-y grail

the whole-y grail

Official blog of the warden ettinger group, a full-service, Phila., PA-based PR firm serving a diverse consumer, lifestyle + nonprofit clientele. Our culinary division, The Whole Enchilada PR, caters to restaurateurs, chefs + other food-related businesses, while "the word exchange" is aimed at clients seeking à la carte copywriting services.

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say what you mean

September 14, 2012 , , , , , , , , ,

If you want to be a writer that gets across exactly what you intend, may we suggest getting reacquainted with The Elements of Style, the AP Stylebook and Merriam Webster, all complementary tomes that serve to make you (and us) conscientious about the words you use. If you’re wondering why there are two here in bold italics, it’s because they represent two of the most commonly confused words. We bring this to your attention, because with all the soundbite communication and “spell check” addiction that we’ve fallen into, correct spelling and grammar, proper capitalization and use of complete sentences are too-oft neglected. No matter where you are in life, age or position, the quickest way to lose the confidence someone has in you, is by exhibiting poor writing habits. It implies: I don’t pay attention to detail, and that is not what anyone seeking to hire you or do business with you, wants to here.

If you’re interested, you can obtain a proper explanation of how to use “that” as opposed to “which,” in this post by one of our favorite online female voices, “Grammar Girl.” We also invite you to leave a comment here about the how/why of using “complementary” or its evil twin, “complimentary,” and assign you the task of researching these commonly misused words:

  • afterwards
  • adverse/averse
  • premier/premiere
  • then/than
  • ultimate
  • principal/principle
  • insure/ensure

If you’re so inclined to leave a comment on these too, please do. Otherwise, enjoy—and use—your knowledge.

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